Historical Research

About Finding Joaquin by Steve Bartholomew

Posted by on Apr 24, 2017 in 19th Century U.S., Featured Book, Historical Research, Historical Tidbits | Comments Off on About Finding Joaquin by Steve Bartholomew

There’s a razor-thin line between history and fiction. Scholars used to think the Iliad was all made up, until the actual ruins of Troy were found. What fascinates me about the bandit Joaquin Murietta is that no one really knows how much of his story is true. My book Finding Joaquin is not the first fictional narrative about this man. In fact, one of the first novels written in California was inspired by his life. This was The Life and Adventures of Joaquin Murieta, by John Rollin Ridge. Note the difference in spelling of the bandit’s name. There are a number of other variations,...

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Haworth Then and Now by Karen Perkins

Posted by on Mar 27, 2017 in 19th England, Featured Book, Historical Research, Historical Tidbits | 2 comments

Haworth has a great deal to offer today’s visitors, including a working steam railway, the iconic cobbled high street (thankfully lined by a myriad of interesting shops and teashops that provide very pleasant rest stops along the climb), and of course wonderful walks through the stunning moorland that makes up so much of Brontë Country. As a booklover, I can think of no more inspiring place than the home of my literary heroines, Charlotte, Emily and Anne Brontë, and I visit as often as I can. The Brontë Society and Parsonage Museum has lovingly re-created their home, demonstrating how they...

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The (Not Quite) True Story of the Real Cinderella By Libbie Hawker

Posted by on Feb 27, 2017 in Ancient Egypt, Featured Book, Historical Research, Historical Tidbits | 2 comments

I’m a big fan of podcasts. I listen to them whenever I get the chance—while I’m going for walks, working in my garden, cleaning the house, or traveling to the mainland to take care of all the errands and chores I can’t do here on the island. Not too long ago, I came across a podcast called Disney Story Origins, a well-produced and fascinating show that explores the real history behind all the best-loved Disney films. Sadly, the podcast hasn’t had any recent updates, but it led me to research the source material behind of many of the films that hadn’t yet been covered by Disney Story Origins....

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Research and The Return of the Raven Mocker by Donis Casey

Posted by on Feb 8, 2017 in 20th Century US, Featured Book, Historical Fiction Influences, Historical Research | Comments Off on Research and The Return of the Raven Mocker by Donis Casey

Primary Research When the Raven Mocker returns to Boynton, Oklahoma, in the fall of 1918, he brings with him the great worldwide influenza pandemic that claimed fifty million lives. World War I is still raging in Europe, but Alafair Tucker is fighting her own war as the epidemic sweeps through like wildfire. What a perfect time for someone to commit murder. Who’s going to notice? In 2004, when I was writing my first Alafair Tucker mystery, The Old Buzzard Had It Coming, I was particularly concerned with the kind of life Alafair would have led in 1912, so much of my research consisted of...

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The Wild Man, The Goat Woman & the Mississippi Miser by Michael Llewellyn

Posted by on Jan 2, 2017 in 20th Century US, Featured Book, Historical Research, Historical Tidbits | 1 comment

Southerners didn’t write the book on eccentricity, but we’ve certainly supplied literature with more than our share of audacious characters and plots. From the Lesters of Tobacco Road and Boo Radley, to Ignatius J. Reilly and the denizens of Yoknapatawpha County, Dixie has produced a bumper crop of picaresque folk. Fiction, however, rarely eclipses fact. The real-life 1932 Goat Castle Murder in Natchez, Mississippi, was the perfect paradigm, screwy and sensational enough to demand, for the first time in American history, two special tourist trains to a crime scene. It seemed few could resist...

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Bringing one soldier’s experience to life by M.K. Tod

Posted by on Nov 7, 2016 in Featured Book, Historical Research, World War One | 2 comments

For the past six or seven years, I’ve been fascinated with World War One. So much so that I’ve written three novels centred on that horrifying world conflict. And still it haunts me. Initially, I concentrated on understanding my grandfather’s experience and his role in the Signal Corps but I quickly broadened the scope to include other roles, military strategy, the chain of command, seminal battles, the causes of war, the home front and many other areas. I read fiction and non-fiction to augment online research and visited the war museum in Canada’s capital city of Ottawa. My latest novel,...

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